British post-industrial / ambient group O Yuki Conjugate re-releases ‘Equator” with bonus material

Out via Other Voices is the re-release of “Equator”, the 1995 album by the British…

British post-industrial / ambient group O Yuki Conjugate re-releases'Equator" with bonus material

Out via Other Voices is the re-release of “Equator”, the 1995 album by the British post-industrial / ambient group O Yuki Conjugate. Originally released in 1995, it came four years after their “Peyote” release on Projekt.

The album comes in a ‘revisited expanded edition’ and features an additional 30 minutes of material, together with new artwork from artist and actor Frederick Schimmelschmidt. “Equator” was one of the first albums to be mixed with digital equipment, weaving together a blend of studio, live and location recordings to create their own soundscapes.

It was released on the Staalplaat label which ensured O Yuki Conjugate remained in total obscurity in their home country. Produced by Paul Schütze and O Yuki Conjugate, it should please fans of Muslimgauze, Paul Schutze, Zoviet★France and related acts.

Below is the original release:

About O Yuki Conjugate

O Yuki Conjugate (OYC) are an English post-industrial/ambient musical group founded in 1982 in Nottingham by Roger Horberry and Andrew Hulme and still – intermittently – active today. While their music has been variously described as ‘ambient’, ‘fourth world’, ‘ethnic’, ‘tribal’ and ‘dark wave’; the band prefer to call it ‘dirty ambient’.

They are currently in their fourth incarnation based around Horberry and Hulme. Previous members include Clare Elliot, Tim Horberry, Malcolm McGeorge, Dan Mudford, Pete Woodhead and Rob Jenkins, with Joe Gardiner contributing sax.

Originally inspired by the spirit and sound of post-punk, they soon started pioneering their own brand of ambient at a time (early 80s) when few people were interested in such a low-key approach. Their debut album “Scene In Mirage” (a mission 1984) perfectly encapsulated their position: one side was beat driven and electronic, the other side was organic and made up of ambient soundscapes. Today their approach to music-making is deliberately eclectic, combining high tech editing, low tech electronics and found instrumentation.

In May 2017, following a lengthy period of hibernation (a regular feature of the band’s career), OYC released a new album called “Tropic”, essentially two long pieces generated out of material recorded during the “Equator” sessions almost 20 years earlier.



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